The Orange Icon..

You know the one that signals a webfeed (formerly known as RSS or Atom). Over at Microsoft they’re pondering what new icon they should pick. Mind you, this single icon will be viewed by millions of upcoming IE 7 users.
So all you usability guru’s, web designer, graphic designers, … if you have an alternative or an opinion go and leave a comment on their Team RSS blog now!!!

This is what they’ve come up with so far:

  1. beta 1
  2. gleam
  3. ring
  4. spark
  5. waves

Personally I’m not sure what to think of it. Besides “I don’t like them…”. Maybe it’s because they’re ripped out of their context, namely the address bar of the upcoming IE 7. Or it’s just something brewing in the back of my head. (And should I tell Microsoft…?)

Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar Beta vs Web Developer toolbar extension

“Imitation the Sincerest Form of Flattery.” Or so they say. But I don’t know if this holds true when the imitating party is… Microsoft. Sorry Chris, it’s about time to move on to greener pastures. 😉

Why the sarcasm? Well, Microsoft released a beta of their Developer Toolbar for Internet Explorer. So? Well, that’s what I thought. Why would I install a beta toolbar for IE when my main developement tool is Firefox with the Web Developer toolbar. Among others.
Just out of curiosity I gave it a go. You can download the developer toolbar beta for IE here. Don’t! If you are running Vista as it seems to crash the system.

So here are my first impressions.

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Opera giving away their browser for free

Opera logoYou could have gotten a free copy of Opera on their 10th birthday already. But if you’ve missed that opportunity there’s some great news from Norway. Opera announced today it will be offering Opera for free! No more ad-banners and licensing fees. They will only charge you money for Premium Support.

“Today we invite the entire Internet community to use Opera and experience Web browsing as it should be,” said Jon S. von Tetzchner, CEO, Opera Software. “Removing the ad banner and licensing fee will encourage many new users to discover the speed, security and unmatched usability of the Opera browser.”

Cutting through the marketing bull: its free now and it’s marketshare will probably rise as it is another good alternative to Internet Explorer. Which is rapidly becoming archaic. I encourage people to at least try it once (or take a look at firefox ;-)).

Get your free copy of Opera now.

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Firefox: Europe beats North America

According to French market analysis company XiTi the market share of Firefox in Europe is 14.11%. Market share in North America is only 11.78%. But Australia takes the lead with 14.41%. 😉

Zooming in on Europe, the leading country is Finland with a staggering 31.03% followed by Germany with a 24,5% market share.

All in all, these numbers are totally different from the 8.69% (worldwide) as reported by Onestat.com in April.

More info in English on Spreadfirefox.

Migrate apps from Internet Explorer to Mozilla

IBM has published a lengthy article explaining how you can make your IE only site work in e.g. Firefox, Opera or Safari.
The article handles browser, DOM, JavaScript, CSS, Event and XML differences. It even touches Quirks vs. Standards mode and Rich Text Editing.

Ever have trouble getting your Internet Explorer-specific Web applications to work with Mozilla? This article covers common issues associated with migrating applications to the open source Mozilla-based browser. You’ll first learn basic cross-browser development techniques, and then develop strategies for overcoming the differences between Mozilla and Internet Explorer.

Read the full article.

IE’s dead, hail the new King!

… and the new king is ‘Longhorn‘!

Well, not exactly, it’s RSS!

I’ve watched the video, scanned Technorati, clicked on TechCrunch, taken a look at the IE Blog, re-visited C|Net, shivered at the Creative Commons Blog, read the last Gnomedex’r story, …

What’s left? I say, Redmond got the idea late in the game. But as usual they took a run with it. Not in a bad sense! It’s just… too overwhelming.

The team formerly known as the IE team apparently renamed itself The RSS team. And they’re considering promoting RSS to be the main glue in the new upcoming Windows. … I’ve got to let this sink in. Amazon wishlists, sorting feeds, OS handling of feeds, RSS aware applications OS, all application use ‘Common Feed List’, Microsoft doing a Creative Commons Share Alike, …

Let’s not forget, it’ll be available officially in 2007. So what does it mean now? I don’t know. What I’m sure of. I got to take a different look at RSS and enclosures.

Turning off the ‘friendly HTTP error messages’ in Firefox

Get Firefox By accident I stumbled upon this Firefox somewhat equivalent of IE’s ‘Show friendly HTTP error messages’ option. Any webdeveloper should have this turned off by default. How else will you know what the problem is? So here’s how to do it:

  1. Open up a new tab (CTRL+T) or window (CTRL+N).
  2. Type in de addressbar: about:config.
  3. In the filterbar type: error and press enter.
  4. Now set the value of the ‘browser.xul.error_pages.enabled‘ to ‘true‘. Double clicking will do.
  5. Restart Firefox.

Now you’ll get extended warnings instead of the simple warning dialogs when, for example, you accidentaly link to a non-existant domain. Or, like me, the dreaded ‘The document contains no data’.

If you don’t know where to find this in IE: ‘Tools’ > ‘Internet Options…’ > ‘Advanced’-tab > Near the end of the ‘Browsing’-section. > Uncheck.